A Reflection on Walking Dogs & My Writing Life

I am a temporary “dog owner”: At least for the next ten days. I offered to help dear friends out and “volunteered” my daughter (who LOVES dogs) to watch a small, well-behaved and rambunctious Daschund named “Lily.” (My daughter is happy happy, for she loves “dogs and cats” that much.)

Lily, isn’t trouble or very high maintenance, but then again, it is like having a toddler in the house. When she has a need she makes it known and stays on point until it is met BECAUSE she is single-minded of purpose. She has lots of little needs to be met that are keeping Bronte from staying on point with homework which impacts me, and I find it “amusing.”

DachshundClick here to get Images & Dachshund PicturesPictures

Lily wants to play or be played with or take a short walk or nap on her terms. She snaps to attention from a sleeping state when someone walks by outside, growls or barks, causing a ripple through the room that was previously quiet or filled with the sound of a clacking keyboard.

Morning routine is quickly established by day two. Daughter up “on time” with the help of “alarm dog” Lily to lick her awake. Lily is fed first, Bronte feeds herself second, lunch is made and we head out the door to get Bronte to school and hopefully we are all walking. Cold, cold mornings we were running later than desired so I broke down and dove B to school then drove onto the park to walk “me and Lily” at Crossroads Community Park, a staple in my life.

I’ve been making laps at that park for nearly six years now and I never tire of the seasons being played out in the trees that leaf and bloom and molt and recycle their leaves and berries.

I call this community place the Park of Little White Dogs for so many of the dogs are little and white. Not all of them are but many are some shade of white. Apartment living means downsizing on the dog one can and may have, if they must have a dog.

The second morning I am walking Lily and I and this morning in a fog as thick as white smoke (not pea soup…far too cliche…and this fog isn’t green!) I am greeted more warmly than normal  by other fellow dog walkers. It is as if they see me as one of them.

I am talking aloud more when I am with Lily, because even though she doesn’t exactly talk back, she is taking in all I say with her eyes and ears. So as we take laps and greet dogs and their walkers, we are chatting up about little stuff. And I experience a mixed feeling.

As sweet as it is to have a dog to walk, a companion to talk to, I am also feeling frustrated that I can’t speed-walk like I am more accustomed. We MUST take moments to take in the smells in the grass, by the tree trunks and of course the other dogs. Do I really need to be so driven on my morning walk? Is it really a race? I’m overcome by the urge to slow down.

Once back from our morning outing, she initially bounces about the warm front room wanting to play some before curling up in her nest of blankets on the couch. She “powers down” for a few hours, not a care in the world, but always waking to gently bark when an outsider’s footsteps are picked up outside. Then it is back to sleep. What a life!

And what about me, after my morning walk (with or without a dog to keep me aware of the value of slowing down to take in the scenery)? I now have a calm in my entire body caused by walking away all the excess energy and want to do one thing only.

I’ll hunker down and get some writing done in an order pre-determined yesterday. I’ll do my best not to be distracted or procrastinate or give in to playing too much (smile). I’ll address one writing assignment at a time in the pursuit of less for greater impact.

My guru/teacher this week is an observant and engaged wee small black and tan daschund who requires of me the right kind of attention at the right time who always has a willingness to engage in play. Play and self-care is good for this writer’s soul and creativity.

If I can give to my writing its own daily walk and loving and playful attention, I just may get all the writing items on my bucket list done eventually and at the perfect moments.

 

This entry was posted in Core Values, Developing Creativity and tagged , by Deborah Drake. Bookmark the permalink.

About Deborah Drake

Deborah Drake is the founder of Authentic Writing Provokes, a full-time wordsmith, a publishing specialist, and an avid competitive storyteller. She champions the power of storytelling, good grammar, and on occasion--breaking the rules in the name of innovation. She has helped over a hundred clients develop, write, edit, and self-publish their website content, blogs, and books---Above all, she is an advocate for authentic writing, heart-based marketing, and bold self-promotion--that authentically reflects essence, vision, and mission. “What we can relate to personally, we can understand better, sooner, and more quickly. Authentic self-expression ALWAYS provokes." **Co-author of two non-fiction/self-help books, Burn Your Resume. You Need a Professional Profile and Message in a Bottle.** Deborah appreciates the stunning Pacific Northwest for its greenness even though she misses the salt air and sandy beaches of her native Monterey Peninsula--happily lives in Bellevue with her family, where she starts most days with an early morning walk to fuel her focus and creativity.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *