Writing Practice: What’s the point anyway?

What is the point of developing a Writing Practice?

Lately, I have been using The Right to Write by Julia Cameron as my source for writing prompts to flex my own writing muscles. Surrounded by a pair of equally devoted writers every Thursday night we gather to take on short and long writing prompts that stretch our creative selves and let us play too.

There is a lot of writing I have done that may never be published outside of the journal I write it in. It is that body of work  that keeps me excited about writing for business and pleasure. From time to time I revisit my writing much like re-reading a favorite book and sometimes I am surprised at how I respond to my own writing later.

When to begin a Writing Practice?

My writing life and practice began in a pink plaid Hallmark Diary that locked with a “golden” key. I was 8 years old. Boxes of journals, beautiful, basic, black, brown, leather and fabric later, still I am writing the story of my days and nights and dreams and poems and secrets.

Words have been my friends for as long as I can remember. Journals have been my confidantes when there was no one to tell. Words have kept me vital and brought me peace and made me cry and laugh and kept me going through the meanest, toughest, darkest and also the loveliest moments of my life.

How now do I write after all the years of pursuing a writing practice that was my best friend so often? The ability to write in a fluid manner made it easier for me to write for school, write for college (except that one BIG paper…story later), write for my future career, and write for my legacy.

Each time I hear someone say they were never a good writer or didn’t like writing and as the adult they avoid writing for they find it that hard, I wonder, “Who told them they weren’t capable and creative, how young were they when that occurred and what can I do to restore the enthusiasm I KNOW they once had about creating.”

Maybe it was mudpies or maybe it was stories but there was something; there was something.

Restoring that childlike enthusiasm for creativity is fundamentally what a Writing Practice does for me. It maintains my momentum and it feeds my love of exploring language.

Care to begin but need a champion to help you stay accountable? THAT can be arranged. You need only ask for it.  Ready. Set. Write On.

Deborah
Authentic Writing Provokes every time!

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About Deborah Drake

Deborah Drake is known by a mantra: Authentic Writing Provokes. A full-time writer and editor and avid blogger, her professional experience spans over 20 years in the fields of journalism, publishing, advertising and design communications, professional development and coaching. She left McCann-Erickson in San Francisco to move to Seattle and join Bozell Worldwide in 1998. After working for several smaller agencies she took the leap into being a free agent in 2007 and has never looked back. She is a passionate wordsmith of short and long writing, engaging SEO copywriting, a Social Media Enthusiast, and a fan of WordPress as the DIY platform it is. Deborah has facilitated a weekly Writers Support Group for two years and founded a community blog that is home to over 800 posts and growing daily. Her writing and editing services include ghostwriting, marketing copywriting, copyediting, and writing/blogging coaching for the DIYer who needs an accountability partner they can creatively brainstorm with. "I believe your WordPress site DESERVES both good design and good copy. They are in a symbiotic relationship: each benefiting the other." Beautiful Design + User-friendly Functionality + Copy that Provokes = A Client Magnet

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