How Will You Get There from Here?

Retirement vehicleThe encore stage of life can be the perfect time for Baby Boomers to renew their physical self-awareness. When you leave your full time work world, you can feel like you are waking up from a very long sleep. You now have the opportunity to assess the state of your health and well-being as you design your retirement lifestyle.

What would you discover if you viewed your body as the vehicle in which you will travel through the encore stage of your life? If you compared your body to a car, what would it look like? Would it be luxurious and finely tuned like a Maserati? Would it be tough and utilitarian as a Jeep? Or, something in between?

Vehicle Maintenance Checklist

  1. What is the comfort level of your vehicle? How do you feel within your own skin?
  2. What do you use to fuel your body from the inside? How positive is your mindset and self-talk?
  3. What do you nurture your sensory system with? What do your eyes see? What do your ears hear? What does your skin touch?
  4. How well do you maintain your body with regular medical, dental, vision, etc., examinations?
  5. What emergency services are available in case you experience any physical challenges?
  6. What external conditions do you expose your body to? How healthy and supportive is your environment?
  7. What do you use to decorate your body – hair, clothes, makeup, etc.?
  8. What retirement lifestyle activities do you expect your body to perform and what do you do to ensure its long-term reliability?

As you set out on the journey through the encore stage of your life, what additional preparations and practices will help you maintain your body in peak condition? This is the time of your life to leverage your knowledge, wisdom, and expertise to live a life of fulfillment and contribution with ease.

Janice Williams, Retirement Coach, www.welcomingretirement.com

 

Self-Responsibility Starts with I am

Self-responsibility in retirementThis is the good news, especially when you plan your retirement lifestyle. Your life is in your hands. You get to make the choices, elect the options and take the actions that come with self-responsibility. It’s through the door of self-responsibility that your personal power and independence enter, often hand-in-hand, bearing gifts of confidence and self-esteem.

Self-responsibility is not the same as feeling responsible or accepting the blame for bad things that have happened or situations that are painful. We don’t all enter the world with the same trappings, and people, events or circumstances have wreaked trauma and caused wounds from which many are recovering. Self-responsibility means that when you have worked through your grief or anger or other issues, you can ask yourself: Now what am I going to do? What options do I have? How will I thrive in the third phase of life when I retire?

At the other end, self-responsibility doesn’t mean becoming so self-reliant you don’t ask for help when you need it or seek others’ opinions or points of view. And it certainly doesn’t mean you have to know everything, make every decision alone or take on the world single-handedly. This is especially important to remember during retirement when you may no longer have the structure and community you relied upon in your work world.

Rather than a heavy burden, self-responsibility can be a source of joy. Knowing you can create the retirement lifestyle you want by accepting responsibility for yourself is a great freedom. Even saying the words aloud can produce a feeling of power and strength. Try it:

  • I am responsible for my choices and actions
  • I am responsible for how I use my time
  • I am responsible for my behavior and communication with others
  • I am responsible for achieving my desires, dreams and wishes
  • I am responsible for the work I do and the quality I bring to that work
  • I am responsible for the values I live by and standards I set

Granted, saying the words out loud can be a little scary and intimidating, as well and empowering. Accepting and acting out of self-responsibility isn’t like falling off the proverbial log; it’s not that easy. It takes practice and working through and making mistakes and falling back and finding yourself in a place you didn’t want to be again. But that’s the thing about personal growth, the place to start is where you are now. Transitioning into your retirement lifestyle is one of the greatest opportunities for personal growth by acting out of self-responsibility.

Author’s content used under license, © 2008 Claire Communications

CEO Roundtable

Date: July 20th, 2012

Location: Kirkland Public Library 3308 Kirkland Ave, Kirkland WA

Time: 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM (Meets Monthly)

Registration: www.ideal-companies.com

This is a roundtable discussion of business issues faced by business owners, CEO’s and motivated entrepreneurs, including solo entrepreneurs and small business professionals. Each attendee will have the opportunity to highlight an issue they face in growing their business. Other attendees will offer their input based on their own knowledge and experience. This event is a very dynamic form of the mastermind. Please come and participate in this learn and share event.

Be an author in Google

Last week, at the Tuesday’s with Deborah meeting, I brought up the new ability to be listed in Google as an author. Several people asked me how to do that. If you go to the following link on Google information about how to create authorship is available for your use:

https://plus.google.com/authorship

The nice thing about this is it when somebody Googles you or an article you wrote your picture will come up it will save by your name and it’ll have an additional link that says more by your name. It keys off your Google plus profile.

Hopefully this is helpful.

Authoring the Future Economy

An Seattle Times article described a community event that they described as being about resumes and job hunting. Instantly, I thought of the wise words of Phill Briscoe, Gerald Grinter, and John C Erdman.

What if there were an evening at Town Hall in Seattle with these three writers (who are also architects and designers of the economy of the future)?

What if such an evening also included Deborah Drake’s collaborative book “Burn Your Resume?”

What if it were not an evening, but a half-day conference at a place like the Albers School of Business at Seattle University?  That may seem like a fantasy right now, but all the writers linked here should hear from me that the content they share at TwD and in writing is, in my opinion, what university students and the public could be offered at a half-day conference at a place that is a laboratory and greenhouse for the new economy.

CEO Roundtable March 16th

Date: March 16th, 2012

Location: Kirkland Public Library 3308 Kirkland Ave, Kirkland WA

Time: 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM (Meets Monthly)

Registration: www.ideal-companies.com

This is a roundtable discussion of business issues faced by business owners, CEO’s and motivated entrepreneurs, including solo entrepreneurs and small business professionals. Each attendee will have the opportunity to highlight an issue they face in growing their business. Other attendees will offer their input based on their own knowledge and experience. This event is a very dynamic form of the mastermind. Please come and participate in this learn and share event.

CEO Roundtable February 17th

This is a roundtable discussion of business issues faced by business owners, CEO’s and motivated entrepreneurs, including solo entrepreneurs and small business professionals. Each attendee will have the opportunity to highlight an issue they face in growing their business. Other attendees will offer their input based on their own knowledge and experience. This event is a very dynamic form of the mastermind. Please come and participate in this learn and share event.

This is a monthly event and generally meets on the third Friday of the month.  We meet at the Kirkland Library, 308 Kirkland Ave, Kirkland, WA.  Time is 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM.  Register at www.ideal-companies.com.

Earning Trust (part one)

“Do I trust people”?  Others may ask many questions about you, but this is a key one.  Trust lies at the root of building good interpersonal relations.  Research into human relations proves that if trust is present, weaknesses tend to be overlooked and mistakes tolerated.  Some people are trusted, and some are not, it depends on how they behave.  Trust is grounded in four very concrete and specific behaviors: Acceptance, Integrity, Openness, Reliability.  The presence of these four behaviors lead others to say: “I trust you”.  If you put these four behaviors into practice, you’ll be trusted.  If you don’t, you won’t.  Simple as that.  Let’s look at each of the four in turn, to get the whole picture.  Each Behavior will be a separate post.

Trust requires acceptance.  If I sense you accept me as a person, I’ll trust you.  That means I must sense that you feel it’s OK for me to be me, you don’t pass judgment on me, you don’t put me down and you don’t treat me as an “it” by trying to manipulate me, treat me as an inferior or by just criticizing me.  You accept me as an individual with my thoughts, feelings, interests, differences and my imperfections.  You don’t have to agree with me, but you do have to accept me.  If I sense you don’t accept me, I won’t trust you, because I’ll wonder if you are trying to use me, or deal with me only as a means to your ends.  If you behave in an accepting manner by taking me as I am, treating me as a worthwhile person, showing respect for my personhood and not judging me, then your behavior will lead me toward trusting you.  Acceptance is necessary to earn trust.

Continue to Part 2

Earning Trust (part two)

If you have not read the whole series, this link will take you to the start of the series.

Trust is grounded in four very concrete and specific behaviors: Acceptance, Integrity, Openness, Reliability.  The presence of these four behaviors lead others to say: “I trust you”.  If you put these four behaviors into practice, you’ll be trusted.  If you don’t, you won’t.  Simple as that.  Let’s look at the second of the four behaviors.

Trust requires integrity.  If I sense you are being straight forward with me, I’ll trust you.  That means I must see you as being honest with me.  I must perceive that you mean what you say and say what you mean; that’s having integrity.  If I sense that you are telling me one thing and feeling the opposite, trust goes down.  If I don’t see and feel your integrity, I won’t trust you, because I’ll be in doubt about what you really mean.  Feeling that I can’t count on you to tell me the truth.  If you behave in a honest way, saying what you mean and meaning what you say, then your behavior will lead me toward trusting you.  Integrity is necessary to earn trust.

 
Continue to Part 3

Earning Trust (part three)

If you have not read the whole series, this link will take you to the start of the series.

Trust is grounded in four very concrete and specific behaviors: Acceptance, Integrity, Openness, Reliability.  The presence of these four behaviors lead others to say: “I trust you”.  If you put these four behaviors into practice, you’ll be trusted.  If you don’t, you won’t.  Simple as that.  Let’s look at the third of the four behaviors.

Trust requires openness.  If I sense you are being open with me, I’ll trust you.  That means I must feel that you are letting me in on what you know about the matter at hand, at least the essentials.  I must perceive that you are willing to let me know what affects me; that’s being open.  If I sense you are keeping important things to yourself or that you have a hidden agenda, trust goes down and you become less believable to me.  If you behave in an open way, share information with me and tell me what you have in mind, then your behavior will lead me toward trusting you.  Openness is necessary to earn trust.

 

Continue to Part 4