10 Tips to Transition with Ease into Your Encore Years

Transition into encore stageNavigating the transition from the full time work world to the encore stage of life can disrupt Baby Boomer’s identity. The transition period between their previous professional focused identities to their retirement lifestyle identities can feel very unsettling. What will you consider your identity to be during this period of in-between knowing?

This phase of transition allows you the opportunity of deep self-exploration and transformation. You may experience it as a major struggle or a time of wonder.

What identity do you want to take on for your encore years? What aspects of your previous identity will you carry forward that will serve you in new ways? What aspects will no longer be useful and should be released?

10 tips to transition with ease into your encore years:

  1. Have the courage to recognize that you are experiencing a major life transition.
  2. Believe in yourself and whatever higher power supports you.
  3. Be gentle and patient with yourself as you explore new ways of doing and being.
  4. Allow yourself to not have all of the answers, or be in control.
  5. Observe your habits and routines to determine which ones serve you now.
  6. Notice what you are pretending to not know.
  7. Trust that you will always have everything that you need.
  8. Practice gratitude for what you do have.
  9. Seek good company that supports and inspires you.
  10. Show up in the present moment and give your very best.

As you enter your encore stage of life, you can create whatever identity that you desire. It will include both who you are being in the world and how you spend your time during your retirement lifestyle. What are your strengths and values to tap into now to build your new identity? What strengths and value do you have to offer others as you make new contributions to society? Now is the time to create your best life yet.

My story

Whenever I experience myself going through transitions – major or minor, I refer to these ten ways to restore my sense of ease. There will be moments when I feel stuck and have no idea what to do next. Other times I will feel like I am lost in space, drifting through the unknown. When I pause and remember to consider these ten tips, my confidence and clarity are restored. I know I will make it to my next new beginning with ease.

How will you transition with ease into your encore years?

Janice Williams, Retirement Coach, www.welcomingretirement.com

 

How to Lose 25 lbs in One Week

The transition that Baby Boomers make when they leave their full time work world and enter their encore stage of life can seem chaotic. During your work world you may have experienced a certain amount of order. Your new retirement lifestyle may not seem so orderly because it is a new experience for you.

One successful way to navigate your transition into retirement is to create space and order in your life by getting rid of all of the items in your environment that no longer serve you. By decluttering, you can lose 25 lbs or more in just one week.

The idea of sorting through all of your accumulated stuff may seem daunting at first. Start with a small project that you can complete in a short time and see significant results, such as cleaning a desk or a closet. Your encore years open a new era for you, and letting go of the past will create space for what new is to come.

Your underlying motivation for decluttering can serve as the fuel to accomplish creating new space and order in your environment. What benefits will you receive from decluttering in preparation for your retirement?

  • Eliminate items that no longer serve you, and can suck your energy.
  • Offer your items that you no longer use to others who can benefit from them.
  • You may receive money from reselling your reusable items.
  • Imagine what it would be like for someone else to deal with your belongings if you should be unable to do so in the future.
  • What does your clutter say about you, and what would it tell others?
  • Allow your values to guide your decisions of what to keep to support your new retirement lifestyle, and what to eliminate.
  • If you had a major life change, like the opportunity to relocate, how long would it take you to pack?
  • What can you learn about yourself as you sort through items you may not have touched for a long time?
  • What treasures might be unearthed from your clutter?

Navigating the transition into retirement can feel unsettling. The process of sorting through your belongings and eliminating those items that you no longer use can give you a sense of purpose and accomplishment at a time when you may feel lost.

Design a plan for your project to create order and space in your environment and move forward at a pace that is appropriate for you. And, remember to ask for help. Invite friends and family to join with you in your process. Or, challenge each other to complete your own decluttering projects. Lastly, there are many talented professional organizers who have a passion to help people dispose of their unwanted belongings. To find an organizer in your area, see http://www.napo.net

What 25 lbs can you lose this week?

Janice Williams, Retirement Coach, www.welcomingretirement.com

 

How Comfortable Are You with Ambiguity?

Ambiguity for Baby BoomerThe major life change for Baby Boomers when they leave their full time work world is an external event that happens. How will you experience your transition through your change into your encore stage of life? You will go through endings and new beginnings, bridged together with periods of unknowing which can feel very unsettling in your retirement lifestyle.

If you have been deeply immersed in your full time work world, you may have felt very comfortable and confident with your responsibilities and your relationships. When you move into your retirement, you may feel overwhelmed by your unknown future. It may seem so ambiguous to you.

Your encore stage of life is a time for exploring yourself in new ways. You may feel bewildered by all of the questions you ask yourself about how to spend your time and what your identity will be. Instead of trying to take control of your life as you may have been used to doing in your work world, I suggest that you give yourself time and space to allow new understanding and new opportunities to arise. You’ve never been in your encore stage of life before. It is a new time to ask yourself new questions and make new choices for yourself.

The poem below by Rainer Maria Rilke beautifully states how to understand this time of unknowing.

Have patience with everything unresolved in your heart and try to love the questions themselves, as if they were locked rooms or books written in a very foreign language. Don’t search for the answers, which could not be given to you now, because you would not be able to live them. And the point is to live everything. Live the question now. Perhaps then, some day far in the future, you will gradually without even noticing it, live your way into the answer. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke

Approach your encore stage of life with humility and patience, feeling gratitude for your capacity to expand your own self awareness. This exploration will strengthen your ability to live a retirement lifestyle of fulfillment and contribution, leaving a legacy of your choice.

What questions are you living right now?

Janice Williams, Retirement Coach, www.welcomingretirement.com

How to Upgrade Your Life in 2013

The New Year has begun! This is a time of year when many people commit to new goals and resolutions for the year ahead. As a Baby Boomer, what will you do to thrive in your encore stage of life this year? The choice is yours.

When you are on the threshold of retirement, you may feel overwhelmed about your unknown future. I recommend that you hold the intention that you will upgrade the quality of your life as you plan your retirement lifestyle. Use that intention as your guiding light to make your transition with ease.

One effective way to upgrade the quality of your life is to survey what is working and what is not working for you in your current lifestyle. What do you want to be doing this time next year, and what will it take to get you there?

You may feel perfectly content with your current retirement lifestyle. If so, allow yourself to be open to explore any unsought opportunities that may present themselves to you during the months ahead. By holding the intention to always focus on upgrading the quality of your life, you will make beneficial choices for yourself when such opportunities arise.

No matter where you are in your transition into your retirement lifestyle, you can upgrade the quality of your life by creating new habits. The dictionary defines the word HABIT as an acquired behavior pattern regularly followed until it has become almost involuntary.

Looking at your own life, what new habit or habits would you like to create that would upgrade the quality of your encore lifestyle? Areas such as your health and well being, relationships, finances, etc. Pick just one or two habits to create at a time so that you will avoid feeling overwhelmed. It takes about a month for a habit to become almost involuntary when it is practiced consistently and regularly, such as working out at the gym at a specific time on specific days each week.

When you successfully achieve your new habit, celebrate the ways in which you have upgraded the quality of your life. Your achievement can inspire you to make other new habits. You will have the confidence that you have the power to make changes in your retirement life.

What new habits will upgrade the quality of your life this year?

Janice Williams, Retirement Coach, www.welcomingretirement.com

 

2013: Year of Challenge

2012 was my back to basic year. It helped me get back to who I am as a person and get certain parts of my life back on track. Sometimes it is good to go back to basics and work on the easy stuff.

2013 is my year of challenges. I am challenging myself to take it up a notch. Each month will have a different challenge.

Meat

Meat (Photo credit: yum9me)

The first challenge is the Whole 30 challenge.

 

http://whole9life.com/

I am going to do my best of eating no grains, dairy and sugar. I am going to evaluate my relationship with food. More information will be available through out the month.

What is your challenge for 2013? What are you going to do differently this year?

Your Spiritual Life Coach
Brett Dupree
www.joyousexpansion.com

Wibbily Wobbily Timey Whimey

]This post is a long time coming. It has been a while since I have written in my blog. One of the reasons is that life got in the way. I had two decently tragic events in my life. One was kind of tragic sort of bummy. The other was devastating to the point of crushing. Death of close family members is never a fun thing. One of the fun parts about getting older is that, unless something happens to me, more and more of my older family members are going to die. Oh joy.

Well this blog isn’t supposed to be a bummer, it is supposed to be a rebirth. Time to come back up from the ashes of things not going as well as I would like and rededicate myself to love and joy. Take what I have learned from the current experiences and use them to serve.

Wibbly Wobbly Time

Sonic Screwdriver

Sonic Screwdriver (Photo credit: Maggie Osterberg)

I have a confession. I am a kind of a geek or nerd. I love Doctor Who. However this post is not about Doctor Who. It is about a concept that I enjoy from Doctor Who. It is about how time works.

A constant message during the spiritual workshops I have been to is that after taking such a workshop that my life can be turned upside down. All of the workshops have mentioned the fact that going deeper in spirituality can lead to radical life changes.

Before my life went through a radical change, I took a wonderful meditation workshop by Intuitive Mind. Nancy Rebecca lead a very fun introduction to meditation workshop. She mentioned that doing the meditation can lead to huge life changes, such as divorce, job changes, moving across country, the normal spiritual life changes. Warrior Sage mentioned that as well. So has Abraham.

Well I digress, I was doing the meditation twice a day, then I had to cut down to one a day. I couldn’t go to sleep after getting so joyed up. How do you fall asleep when feeling awesome and energized? Leave a comment if you know how.

Yoga

Yoga (Photo credit: RelaxingMusic)

After a month of meditating I lost a high paying job. That was a pretty big bummer. Had so many plans. Then two weeks later, my 41 year old Uncle Mike passed on. My Uncle‘s death really put the whole losing a job thing in perspective, because that was a much bigger bummer. On a scale of 1 to 10 of bummer, where 1 is a little bummer and 10 is a huge bummer, it was a million. My Uncle Mike is one of my closet family members. I love him a lot. Losing him on this life plane is very painful.

That got me to thinking about what Nancy Rebecca said about life going crazy after starting this meditation. When being told this I always thought about a cause and effect relationship. I start to meditate and then stuff starts happening.

However I cannot believe that me beginning meditation causes my Uncle’s death. I do not believe I have the power to kill people with just the power of mediation, yet. Just kidding. I also do not believe that my spiritual actions can cause anything to happen in other people’s lives. Spirit isn’t going to cause nearly 100 people to lose their jobs and kill a person just to teach me a lesson.

This leads me to my wibbily wobbly timey whimey theory. For some reason I was drawn to that meditation class. Which was interesting because I was not feeling the need to take a class. I still have my spiritual hubris mode of not needing to learn anything more thing going on. Since time isn’t just a straight line, I believe that without a shadow of a doubt that my spirit knew that a tough time was coming up and lead me to a practice that would help me get out of the funk that tough time would cause.

I have started to meditate again and I feel the cloud lifting. Life has a lot of ups and downs. Events that you do not want to happen will happen. How you react to them and how back you come back to love is your practice. It has taken me a few months to come back to love after my Uncle’s death. If it wasn’t for my spirit giving me some new tools, who knows how much longer it would have taken.

When you feel the desire to take a class or workshop, and then your life goes down the drain, take a moment to thank your higher self. Your higher self guided you to your teachings to provide you with tools to help you go through the rough waves of your life.

By Spiritual Life Coach
Brett Dupree
http://www.joyousexpansion.com

 

Your Year End Checklist

Reflections for Baby BoomersNo matter where Baby Boomers are on the threshold of their retirement, it can be very beneficial to track their transition into their encore stage of life. Before creating visions and goals for your next year, I recommend taking time at the end of this year to reflect back on what you experienced during the current year.

10 Questions for Review and Reflection

Read through your calendar, journal, and any other documentation you may have used to record the events of this year. Give yourself uninterrupted time to do your review and reflections. Ask yourself these 10 questions:

  1. What overall pattern or trend did you discover for the year?
  2. What is one achievement that you are most proud of?
  3. What helped you to make that achievement happen?
  4. What stood in the way of achieving what you had planned?
  5. What do you want to work more on in the coming year?
  6. What will be different next year?
  7. What unexpected gifts or challenges did you experience this year?
  8. What do you wish you had known at the first of this year that you know now?
  9. If you could wave a magic wand, what would you make happen right now?
  10. What title would you give this year to fully describe it? – The year of ____________.

When you take the time to thoroughly review and reflect upon what you experienced in the current year, you honor your time, your energy, and your effort. It can be viewed as the stepping stone for what is to come next and can serve as a guide for you when you create your vision and goals for the upcoming year.

What did you learn from your review and reflection of this year?

Janice Williams Retirement Coach, www.welcomingretirement.com

 

 

Do You Practice Life-Long Learning?

Learning in encore yearsWhat will your identity be when you leave your full time work world and enter into the encore stage of your life? This stage of life gives baby boomers an opportunity to branch out and explore new ways of being and doing during their retirement years.

One support for clarifying your new identity is life-long learning. If you were totally immersed in your professional world, the learning you experienced over the years may have been focused on acquiring work-related knowledge, skills and abilities. How will learning manifest in your retirement lifestyle?

Expand your expertise

You can build on the expertise that you already have, as well as explore new learning topics, resulting in numerous benefits. Should you want to take another form of employment or volunteerism, you may need to update your skills in order to be relevant and successful. Perhaps you have always wanted to learn about a particular subject and never took the time to do so while you were working. If you plan to travel, you may want to learn a new language that could make your travel experience richer.

There are other benefits you can receive from learning new subjects. Brain science is learning more and more about how learning stimulates the brain cells and can slow the aging process. When you learn about new subjects, you can also become a more interesting conversationalist. And, in the learning process, you will meet new, like-minded people.

Share your expertise

Your encore stage of life is a prime time to share your existing expertise, as well as your newly acquired knowledge. You can teach the subject matter to others, either in the form of employment or as a volunteer. As you teach, you continue to learn more about the subject as well as yourself and interacting with others. Lastly, you will leave a legacy of the value of your expertise with others who learn from you.

How to enhance your expertise

There are numerous ways to refine what you already know and learn about new subjects that fit your retirement lifestyle, such as:

  • Online learning
  • Universities, colleges, community colleges
  • Professional associations
  • Centers for life-long learning
  • Government agencies

How will life-long learning enrich your retirement lifestyle?

Janice Williams, Retirement Coach, www.welcomingretirement.com

 

Discover Your Family Treasure

Stories of familyThe encore years of life offer Baby Boomers a time for reflection and conversations to discover valuable family stories. When you uncover the stories you hold for your own life you create greater awareness of how you fit into your family. And, when you share your stories with others in your family, you expand their perspective of their own lives, as well as of the family as a whole.

Reflections on your own life stories can help you design your retirement lifestyle. What do you remember as the most important? Are there any repetitive themes? How can they inform your choices for the next stage of your life?

Discovery Process

There are many ways you can discover your family treasures, including:

  • Journals and diaries that you and others have kept, or currently write.
  • Asking other relatives what they remember about events that you remember – their memories may be illuminating.
  • Allow other relatives to interview you with their own questions which you may never have thought of.
  • Record your discoveries to share in the future by writing them down, or by making audio or video recordings.

Sharing Your Stories

Family members may think they know each other well when they have grown up together. Other relatives may know each other superficially because they see each one another infrequently. Instead of keeping conversations on a mundane level, I encourage you to share the wisdom you have accumulated throughout your life when you reach your retirement years. Your stories will allow others of all generations to know and appreciate you more. Your perspectives on life can inform family members of new ways of experiencing life.

Throughout the ages, and in other cultures, the wisdom of the elders has been highly regarded. I recommend that you gather your own stories and the stories of your family and actively keep them alive by sharing them with one another often.

What family treasures will you discover in your encore years?

Janice Williams, Retirement Coach, www.welcomingretirement.com

Design Your Encore Years

Unfolding encore yearsWhen you search the Internet for information related to retirement lifestyle planning, what words do you enter into the search boxes?

There are many terms that have been used to describe the age range of 50-75, such as midlife, retirement, old age.

Because people are living healthier, longer lives that ever before, many of these terms no longer seem to adequately describe this stage of life. In the beginning of our lives, we have terms like childhood and adolescence that designate specific age ranges. Why not create a new term for this new stage of life?

With so many Baby Boomers living longer, active lifestyles during the years often known as retirement, it is time to create a new standard term for this period of life that is more positive than retirement which means to withdraw.

Marc Freedman has been championing the use of the term encore years to designate the years between midlife and old age. These are years when you can leverage your knowledge, wisdom, and expertise to live your own fulfilling life, make a contribution that is beneficial to society, and leave a legacy of your choice.

Freedman’s two books, Encore and The Big Shift, include inspiring case studies of people who have applied their life experiences in new ways to help solve some of society’s greatest challenges after they left their full time work world. For more information, please refer to his web site, Encore.org.

I support Freedman’s use of the term encore years to designate the emerging gift of additional active life. Let’s retire the word retirement and all the others so that everyone can look forward to and engage in this vibrant stage of life, rather than feel overwhelmed by the unknown future. You can design your own fulfilling lifestyle in your encore years, which may include continuing to work full time or part time, volunteering full time or part time, a combination of enjoying making a contribution along with living at a more leisurely pace. This stage of life is new, free of prescribed roles and responsibilities. It is your unique time to thrive.

Again, when you search the Internet for information related to retirement lifestyle planning, what words do you enter into the search boxes? Next time, include the term encore years.

Janice Williams, Retirement Coach, www.welcomingretirement.com