Hanukkah memories: sour cream or applesauce?

Lighting the Hanukkah Menorah

“Applesauce or sour cream?” will be one of the most hotly debated issues around family tables this Hanukkah, the Jewish Festival of Lights.

The Jewish holiday of Hanukkah begins this coming weekend and will last for eight days. The holiday celebrates the triumph of the Maccabees over the Assyrian Greeks 2300 years ago and of the re-consecration of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem.

Families everywhere will soon sing festival songs and light Hanukkah candles on a Menorah, an eight-branched candelabra, adding one candle each night until the candelabra is completely filled with light on the very last night of the festival holiday.

The issue at stake surrounds the humble Latke, a potato pancake, Hanukkah’s signature food. There are a wide variety of opinions regarding how to make latkes correctly, what they should taste like, and whether a latke is best eaten with a liberal application of applesauce or sour cream. Every family has a slightly different recipe and public heated debates have been held surrounding latkes, their use and preparation. I am a sour cream stalwart.

What was Hanukkah like for you growing up? How did your family prepare latkes? Or did your family like make sufganiyot, ball shaped fried doughnuts instead? Has someone actually written down the family recipe?

Did you family give Hanukkah Gelt, spin the Dreidel together, exchange gifts with one another, Christmas-style. Some families give a gift for each night, some only once, and some give no gifts. What are your family’s festival traditions? How has the Hanukkah celebration changed for your family over the years?

Use can ask these questions and find other questions like these on the Memoriesbroughttolife website. Use them as a guide to recover your parents’ and grandparents’ memories of Hanukkah. There are pages you can use either stand alone, or as part of a family Living Legacy LifeBook.

To obtain these free pages, click on the Downloads tab on the Memoriesbroughttolife website and be guided through a very simple process, entering your name and e-mail address to be provided complementary access to all downloadable files available.

These are irreplaceable memories well worth keeping, valuable memories providing a window into the lives of our ancestors.

Pearl Harbor memories

Where you, your parents or grandparents on the Day of Infamy?

Nothing would ever be the same after that day, December 7, 1941, the day Imperial Japanese airplanes attacked U.S. naval fleets and air force bases in Hawaii.

That day, that would be known as Pearl Harbor Day would be remembered as the day our nation’s view of itself and of its role in the world altered forever and laid the groundwork for the world we know today.

Before the end of the Second World War ended, millions of American would be drafted to serve in the American armed forces and citizens everywhere would join together to support a national war effort.

And it all began seventy-two years ago this week, December 7th, 1941.

How long did it take them to learn of the attack in the days before television and Internet?  How were their lives affected? Did your family plant a Victory garden,  collect tin foil, or participate in scrap drives for the war effort? Do they remember rationing? How did rationing affect your family and community?

Use can ask these questions and find other questions like these on the Memoriesbroughttolife website. Use them as a guide to uncover your parents or grandparents memories of that historic day. These are pages you can use either stand alone, or as part of a family Living Legacy LifeBook.

To obtain these free pages, click on the Downloads tab on the Memoriesbroughttolife website and be guided through a very simple process, entering your name and e-mail address to be provided complementary access to all downloadable files available.

These are irreplaceable memories well worth keeping, valuable memories providing a window into the lives of those who not only remember December 7th 1941, but who actually lived through that historical day.

Kennedy assassination memories: Where were you that day?

November 22, 1963 was the day that changed the history of our nation, much as the events of September 11, 2001 did thirty-eight years later.

It was the day that President John F. Kennedy was shot while riding in a motorcade with First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy and Texas Governor John Connally in Dallas Texas.

I was only thirteen years old standing up in the eighth grade English class of Junior High School 145 in New York when the announcement came out over the school public address system that our president had been shot. It was a moment that is forever etched in my memory.

Where were you; where were they the day President John F. Kennedy was shot?

Use the complimentary templates you will find there as a guide to recover and record how you, your parents or grandparents experienced the day President Kennedy was shot, how it changed our nation, our families and communities and add them to your personal Living Legacy Lifebook.

Thanksgiving Memories: complementary pages to download for your feast

In time for Thanksgiving!

When we stop and think we might notice that Thanksgiving has changed over our lifetimes and the lifetimes of our parents.

Familiar faces that no longer grace our tables, fond family stories of Thanksgivings past, favorite recipes we once shared each year.

As we all gather to celebrate Thanksgiving this year, how about we take the time to stop and remember and preserve memories of Thanksgivings of past years?

Here are complimentary Thanksgiving memory page templates from Memoriesbroughttolife.com ready for your download. Pages you can use either stand alone or as part of your Living Legacy LifeBook.

To take advantage of these pages, go to the Downloads page and be guided through a simple process: enter your name and e-mail to be provided complementary access to all the downloads we currently have available.

We would love for you to have them and add them to your collection and capture these irreplaceable stories.

May we all enjoy a truly memorable Thanksgiving.

paul.zohav@livinglegacylifebook.com

 

Listening for lost narratives – “I did not know that!”

Dear all,

Let’s have some fun!

I am looking for your stories, 100-400 or so words telling something unique, fascinating, entertaining, whimsical, or just plain wow, a tale, a family legend from the lifetime of your parents, grandparents, or beyond for a new blog to be posted on memoriesbroughttolife.com  in the near future.

It is intended to inspire and encourage folks to dig into their family’s living legacies and heritage and share the amazing stories that can be found there.

The theme for the stories is, “I did not know that!”

One of my friends shares a discovery of hers that her mother had been a Playboy Bunny for six months! She certainly was surprised when she found out.

From my family there is the story of my grandmother Celia who, so the story goes, was a teenage radical in Czarist Latvia around 1905. Unbeknownst to my great grandfather, grandmother Celia had been distributing radical leaflets and aroused the interest of the local Russian police.They came to the home of my great grandfather and wanted to search the home for radical literature.Quickly they stuffed the offending literature beneath the parlor room seat and sat my grandmother on it. The police searched throughout the home but did not find any leaflets.

Shortly thereafter my great grandfather decided to ship my grandmother and her younger sister off to America.

What delicious stories, narratives, are in your family tree?

Please post them here on Tuesdays with Deborah for us all to enjoy and send them along to me at livinglegacylifebook@gmail.com.

Thanks!

Paul Zohav

 

 

 

Campus Tour

….and over here we have the cafeteria.  Pretty big.  You get in any of these lines here and pay over there at the registers.  They’ve got salads, pasta, soup, bread, burgers, pizza.  That line over there does entrees.  Some ethnic stuff over there.  Just pick out what you want and pay, then pull up a seat at one of the tables, or outside if it’s not Juneuary.

And down the hall here we’ve got dry cleaning.  Pretty convenient.  Just drop it off when you come in, and it’s ready in a couple days, swing by, take it back home, you know.  It’s pretty nice.

Then here we have the badger room.  It’s where we keep the badgers.  Might want to stay away from there.

And right down here’s the fitness center.  Precors, treadmills, weights, just about everything.  Need to swipe in with your badge.  Open 24/7.  If you hear anything knocking around the south side it’s probably just the badgers.

You know, I wonder why we even have a badger room.  It’s not like they contribute to the core product line.  Not at all.  I can’t think of one impact they might have.  And it’s air conditioned in there…that’s messed up.  There’s like, 400 badgers in there.  Probably why they’re so noisy.  I wonder what they eat.  Probably new hires, hahahaha.  “New meat, got some new meat here!”  Yeah, stay away from that room.  I’m gonna have to ask about that.

The Devil in Uncle Watt

Uncle Watt bit off the head of a big, fat, juicy, green tobacco worm, peed on his deaf cousin, and poked mules in the ass with a sharp stick just to see ‘em kick. Oh, yes, he was full of the Devil. And my efforts to untangle dead ancestors lured me into a genealogical exorcism.

“Oh my Lord, he done got the Devil in ‘im BAD,” Raffie, a stooped, ancient man who used to work beside him on the farm once told me when I was a young lad. As late as July 2009, Helen, one of my beloved aunts and a Beatnik artist then in her 80s, when reminded of Uncle Watt called him “quite a character.” And so I tumbled down the dumbwaiter chute of a family mystery. Who was this “Devil?”

Continue reading @ http://williamdudleybass.com/MyBlog/devil-uncle-watt/.

William Dudley Bass
2009, 2012
Seattle & Shoreline, Washington

NOTE: This essay was first published in my earlier blogs, revised on my new website, On Earth at the Brink, @ http://williamdudleybass.com. It is reprinted here with my permission as the Author. Thank you.

Last Night I Dreamed of a Dead Woman from Long Ago

Six nights ago I dreamed about a long-dead friend and have felt obsessed about it ever since. Just finished looking at old pictures of her I found in dusty high school yearbooks. She graduated in June of 1976 a year ahead of me. Her name was Jo Anne.

We didn’t hang out much at all in high school. We became friends many years later after she tracked me down to Richmond, the capital city of Virginia, where I lived and attended grad school in the mid-1980s. She wasn’t my girlfriend. We were never lovers. More like I was her confidante – Continue reading “Last Night I Dreamed of a Dead Woman from Long Ago” »

The Gratitude List & Embracing Hesitation

I AM in love.

With the journey I do not yet understand
With the upstarts I have not yet met
With the magic that new beginnings are
With the people who surprise me generously
With the smiles freely given and received
With the wonder in the eyes of young ones
With the sound of truth being told

With the simple ability to breathe without having to think about it.

I am of the mindset there is always more to be thankful for. I wasn’t always. There was a time when I felt like a sadder person whose life was colored by more loss than I thought I could handle. And it all started when I was very young. So if it is true that “God/dess” gives us only as much as we can handle, I AM grateful for how I have handled what has been given to me to address.

Abundance and Gratitude is an Attitude that can be cultivated and doing so is a lifelong process. We, humans, have been given both the ability to communicate and remember what  we have said and done and have the capacity to learn from it. What worked for us at four doesn’t work the same for us at fourteen or forty. Nor should it. I AM grateful for how I have evolved and continue to do so.

I feel I AM again the person I was when I was about to embark upon college. Self-reliant. 18. A loaner car of a Dodge Wagon packed to the max with the sum total of my worldly belongings. Few clothes. More books. A box of my life story in journals. Going where I knew but one person. Leaving behind no room to return to. Only a future to embrace. Pure excitement and no hesitation. My body hummed with a knowing that all was as it should be.

Three decades later after many starts and stops and stumbles, I feel as though I AM again in that space of pure possibility and nothing will prevent me from realizing what I have envisioned. I AM committed to believing that what I can dream, I will manifest.

Had even one person introduced me to the idea of intention and my energy being so exquisitely and purposely directed when I was that tender age…what more would have come into being? Oh, here is the surprise behind that curtain: It has all been perfect as it has come to pass. Not that I could see that at 27 or even 34. I see it now though. And that is presence that matters.

Regarding that last moment before we figuratively or literally leap into something new and daring, what is YOUR personal “surefire” way to diffuse any hesitation or procrastination?

May you be blessed with the courage to say yes to your grandest visions, hesitation-free.

Om Shanti.

“I give the world until 1965, max.”

File under the optimism of children.

I was perhaps 7-8 years of age sometime after the Soviet Union put up Sputnik, the very first artificial orbiting satellite and scared the bejeezus out of the United States.

We all looked up in the night sky, aware for the very first time that there was a human-made artifact, an artifact produced by an enemy state orbiting over our heads.

Americans, once secure and surrounded by oceans, began to feel uncomfortably vulnerable – and they began to worry, really worry.

I distinctly recall announcing to my elementary school friends quite matter of factually, that, ” I give us until 1965, maximum.”

This first precious prognostication pronouncement of mine , I am glad to say, did not come true….

From: Making Every Life A Living Legacy