The Daily Affirmation for the Writer Within You

Today I am a relaxed and agile and effective communicator in all interactions. I cultivate a relaxation that steadies me as I channel both brilliant and clear speaking and writing simple and complex.

And for this I am appreciated.

Who benefits from this state of mind that you can cultivate on demand?

You and Others.

May your day of communication be a day of creative graceful exchanges.

Is Your Mission Clear to Those Who Want to Help You?

Is it?

I’ll start the dialogue I hope this post creates with my own attempt to be CLEAR and have a little fun in the process:

“Deborah Drake is on a Creative Writing Mission (be you writing for business or otherwise) : To get you to love doing your own writing and express yourself confidently and with authenticity and whole heart. Writing in this age of “the world being your oyster,” what will it take for you to chase out “for good” the disbelief that you can’t write as yourself and for yourself and attract GREAT readers and clients? Consider this writing coach like an assignment a la Peace Corps…she will teach you how to not only plant that garden and harvest the yield, but craft your own recipes in a cookbook you can then self-publish and market boldly with enthusiasm that lights up a room. Writing is good for the soul, good for business and therapeutic and to be able to authentically self-express who we are, what we do and what we care about in this age is PARAMOUNT. Can you?”

Now here is the challenge for you reader: Add yours in the comments so that we all who read here can see that you want us to understand who you are, what you do, what you seek to cause and what you care about. What will this do for you and us? Make it easier for us to identify opportunities that fit you. Those who know you want to understand how to help and recommend YOU! Trust me on this.

We MUST, MUST, MUST be able to both succinctly, colorfully and effectively express our mission, vision and purpose…okay, so we don’t “need to” to get work done and earn that living, but it makes doing business a whole lot more fun when we attract the clients that choose us because they “get us” even before they might meet us face to face.

Here is one example of some I love…and it’s not quite a brief bio or mission statement but it is in my opinion a home-run….Randal Hart I want my profile to be like yours when mine grows up!

http://biznik.com/members/randal-dehart-pmp-qpa/about

DO try this writing prompt at home and let yourself go. You’ll surprise yourself I bet.

Set a timer for five minutes (yes, all of five minutes and no more initially). Kitchen timer or your mobile phone or what ever timing device is easiest and at hand. Ready, Set, Write…and don’t over think it. That is why we get stuck people! We obstruct the flow of channelled brilliance when we stop and think, “Oh, does that sound good or make sense?”
Write what wants to be written for a change. Trust that it has pearls of wisdom to exploit! Write what comes naturally and then edit it to a piece that is finessed. Or ask a trusted advisor to assist.

The intention is to generate a statement that is bursting with truth and freshness…and I believe you can do just that!  (And help is always at hand when we ask for it.)

Authentic Writing Provokes…Every Time.

Do I Want to Get An Extra Hour Out Of Every Day?

There is a list below offering a myriad of ways to gain back an hour of time. Hey. You could use part of that hour to write for pleasure or business development!!!

And I agree with most of the list..but do I work at all of them all of the time?  Not always and this blog post is about a particular suggestion made that I am going to springboard from…for the sake of making a point!

I LOVE #13. “Eliminate activities which make little contribution to the best results for your life.”

Where you and writing are concerned what activities make the least contribution to the best writing you can do?

In other words, what actitivies and beliefs do you need to shed?

Let’s start here: Thinking you can’t write isn’t helpful. If you send email, you are a writer. You may not be as imaginative or spontaneous or graceful a writer as you’d like to be but if you can convey information, write poetry, an occasional short story, an informational article, or leave a great comment on someone else’s piece–you can write.

If your beef with yourself is about writing “better” or more freely or with more ease, there is always help to found. One need simply ask for it. Sometimes getting to the point of asking for constructive help is where the creative journey begins. Are you willing to ask and then do the work?

“Creative Writing” is put on a mighty high pedestal by many. Often far above Business Writing and Technical Writing. Truth is all of these forms of writing are important. Where would we be without strong technical writers for manuals and directions for putting together IKEA bookshelves (okay, that was a jab at those directions). What would we do if business copy lacked personality? Yawn?

Learning the art of storytelling for the page is what I am talking about! It can be hard work if we doubt our abilities. It could be fun if we committed to practicing every opportunity we had. And that is where I come in.

I’ve met people who tell me with conviction they are not creative. And then I tell them, that can’t possibly be true. Yet they believe they are not creative or skillful at writing. I take on being a stand for their creativity and the belief we all have access to creativity anytime. Writing rules can be learned. Being creative can be cultivated. It gets easier with practice. Writing practice is no different than a gym work out in principle.

My mission professionally and spiritually is simple to me: to educate, inform and inspire writers to love writing and write with heartfelt confidence from an authentic voice.

Getting people to like their own writing is sometimes difficult work and if I could I’d call your elementary school teacher (or the first one) who told you that you weren’t a good writer and give them a piece of my mind…I just might.

Why do we take that misplaced and possibly well intended comment to heart? We all are impacted by early statements made “unconsciously” in ways we don’t imagine at the tender age of seven or nine or fourteen. Another Truth for me: Unwinding and reprogramming ourselves as adults is quite simply more work than cultivating a state of creative openness from childhood. Granted we need patient parents and teachers to keep us on track as we learn the basics as young writers and readers, but can you imagine growing up with the conscious and sub-conscious message that YOU are a creative developing person and your ideas are welcome?

How would that make you feel? And how might that manifest as the future working adult you become, be you self-employed or working in a larger company?

And as for getting an extra hour out of each day, do I want to?

I’ll start tomorrow. Or maybe I will choose to stay up a little late when it gets quieter in my head and outside as well and I find creativity flows through me with more ease.

And in the case you are interested in recapturing an hour for the activity of your choice….

Get An Extra Hour Out Of Every Day

DECEMBER 15, 2008

How can you get an extra hour from each day? This is a basic challenge for all of us. We’ve come up with many practical ways to secure one more precious hour from each day. (Remember that each of these tips is probably adaptable to your particular situation.)

  1. Make up and follow a detailed, daily schedule.
  2. Get up earlier.
  3. Do less passive reading, TV watching and the like.
  4. Avoid allowing others to waste your time.
  5. If you commute to work, use the time to study or plan.
  6. Organize your work; do it systematically.
  7. Make creative use of lunchtime.
  8. Delegate authority if possible.
  9. Spend less time on unimportant phone calls.
  10. Think first; then do the job.
  11. Do instead of dream.
  12. Work hardest when you’re mentally most alert.
  13. Eliminate activities which make little contribution to the best results for your life.
  14. Always do the toughest jobs first.
  15. Before each major act, ask: Is this REALLY necessary?
  16. Choose interesting and constructive literature for spare-moment reading.
  17. Learn how to sleep. Sleep soundly, then work refreshed.
  18. Skip desserts.
  19. Stop smoking.
  20. Write notes or letters while waiting for others.
  21. Always carry an envelope with paper in it, stamps and a few postcards.
  22. Combine tasks which are done in the same area.
  23. Be prompt for all appointments.
  24. Lay out your clothes the night before.
  25. Relax. Ready yourself for the important jobs in life.
  26. Concentrate on the specific task you’re doing.
  27. Make constructive use of those five or ten-minute waiting periods. Carry with you magazine article clippings on helpful subjects.
  28. Always carry a pencil and paper to capture important-to-you ideas.
  29. Learn to do other “unnecessary things” while watching TV or listening to the radio.
  30. Call on specialists to accomplish work you cannot do efficiently.
  31. Learn to read more rapidly.
  32. Nap an hour after dinner. Then take a shower. Begin the evening hours relaxed and refreshed.
  33. Avoid making a “production” out of small tasks.
  34. Avoid interruptions.
  35. Tackle only one job at a time.
  36. Search out job shortcuts.
  37. Know your limitations.
  38. Work to your top capacity.