Call me Trim Tab. And seek yours.

Are you clear on what a Trimtab is and how you can be one?

The engineer Buckminster Fuller is often cited for his use of trim tabs as a metaphor for leadership and personal empowerment. In the February 1972 issue of Playboy, Fuller said:

Something hit me very hard once, thinking about what one little man could do. Think of the Queen Mary—the whole ship goes by and then comes the rudder. And there’s a tiny thing at the edge of the rudder called a trim tab.It’s a miniature rudder. Just moving the little trim tab builds a low pressure that pulls the rudder around. Takes almost no effort at all. So I said that the little individual can be a trim tab. Society thinks it’s going right by you, that it’s left you altogether. But if you’re doing dynamic things mentally, the fact is that you can just put your foot out like that and the whole big ship of state is going to go. So I said, call me Trim Tab.
—Buckminster Fuller
In our efforts to write as ourselves, make an impact on our readers and be effective in business, at the end of the day it is our opportunity to be that “trimtab.”
The first time I ever heard of this small, yet impactful part (be it for airplane or boat) was in 2003. I had met the author of a book on Buckminster Fuller, whose enthusiasm was so real and pure and ongoing (and continues to be.) He knew the philosophy and wisdom of Bucky Fuller like we know our ABCs.
Call me Trimtab.  Try it on for size for yourself if you dare. Imagine you and your writing as being a Trimtab for another.
How do you make yourself a Trimtab? Presuming you are willing, there are a myriad of ways through language and acts of service we can cause the “ripple”  in your readers, your clients, your peers, and those you have yet to meet!
Have you ever read (or overheard) something by someone you didn’t know personally that struck an important chord in you?
What about sharing your best self with intention, with the best hope of being that “little individual” who is at that moment “the trimtab” for the one you know or you don’t.
Apply every best practice you can enthusiastically embrace.
Be real. Be real. Be real.
And know that (or at least I feel) “heart-driven” writing manages to land so elegantly. How can it not?
I so feel like a broken record. And I am okay with it.
Write on…please and with a full heart. Please.

We all need an online presence that is “about us”: Not “stealth”

In an age where you can create an online profile as easily as you can start an email account, it makes sense to me to populate your new profile with some basics–at the very least.

Ideally, your online profile tells a wonderful story about you, making it that much easier for me and others to match-make on your professional behalf.  If I know who you are before you get to my event and my room, I assure you I will create opportunities for you connect with others I know are coming.

The other day I made an introduction to a first time guest, who oversees a blog all about dogs that needs contributors, that she might be interested in knowing the writer/illustrator/artist in our circle, who is also a storyteller, creator of toys and who does custom dog portraits that are very cool! They struck me as a good a match because I knew what each did for their livelihoods. I enjoy connecting people with each other and especially when business grows out of it.

There could be a grand synergy between any two people if each knows what the other is and does and needs.

If you are seeking that next perfect client or a full-time position, doesn’t it make sense to make the effort to share the really good stuff about who you are, what you seek, what you have accomplished and give us a strong picture that is current and lets us spot you quickly at an event we are both attending?

So many seem to initiate an account, barely start a profile, promise themselves to come back to it, and never do. There is a solution to this scenario, but it involves some in depth critical work initially and gentle maintenance thereafter.

As I see it, the key is to develop your full professional profile from the ground up, fill in the stories behind your accomplishments, commit to maintaining it and then get back to working on your business, out in the world. Would you not rather be meeting new contacts online and at events that might know who you are before you get there and seek you out? Or would you just as soon tell the same story over 10+ times to those attending?

If I could ask every member of this community to do but one thing in the next week it would be:

Check your online profile for its “greatness” and a story that reflects who you are. Does it tell your story clearly, engagingly, authentically?

And if you find your canvas is pretty blank (no picture, no summary, no promotion, no involvement in discussions) there is no time like the present to make it happen. And if your profile needs a dust-off and some fresh new content be it your image or logo or links to associations and your contact information, by all means, take that on!

Who will thank you? Who is the winner? I will as one of your community members who looks forward to knowing you should our paths collide online or in person at an event. The future client who can now identify you is another.  And what about the referral partners that are in abundance that you don’t yet know. We all win when community member profiles are current, interesting, multi-dimensional reflections of who we are and what we do and what we seek and offer.

If you need a little guidance on how to go about creating a vibrant profile that showcases you, I can wholeheartedly recommend a book originally written for jobseekers. Résumés that Resume Careers byDon Burrows puts one systematically through a discovery process that yields a great final piece on Brand and Company You. Or you can repurpose your profile content for your website, your blog, or to launch article ideas or seek work if that is your goal. It may take you weeks to complete, but it is worth the sweat equity.

As I see it and experience it, Biznik, in particular, as a community is a stellar example of the hybrid use of online and in-person opportunities to connect and help each other and ourselves.

Are you making it easy for us to do so?

 

Courageous Writing Can Be Learned

Today’s Writers Circle of 20 plus individuals got asked a question by facilitator me that for some seemed almost difficult to answer intuitively and  instinctively (which was okay too).  Everyone though offered up their best answer:

How courageous is your writing presently?

We had a fair number of 7-8’s, a handful of 6’s, some 4’s and even a few 9’s and one 11-12.

What exactly is Courageous Writing on one’s blog (for starters)?

Do you “think” you write courageously?

What might doing so look like?

And if you have yet to,  what would it take for you to do so?

When I was little, really young, writing privately in Hallmark diaries that locked (securely…right?) I was no holds barred. This continues to this day in those journals I don’t “publish.” And then there is what I create and  “publish” on my business site. But there is a bit of me, deep thoughts and all that seep into my business communiques in all forms.

Are you at all comfortable with letting yourself in to your business writing?

And how much is too much? Would you recognize your growing edge?

That “edge” is where what I call courageous writing occurs.

Communicating my competencies beside my vulnerabilities: It is a time to be discerning.

And it can be learned. With support it comes easier.

I invite you to take on being ever more courageous as you share your expertise and share your stories and if you need support it is so close!